Tractor in field

Farm Accident Lawyer

Farms present numerous risks that one may not encounter on a typical property or workplace.

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Farm Injury Attorneys

The law firm of Glasheen, Valles & Inderman has handled numerous farming injury cases. We have handled several grain engulfment cases involving asphyxiation and death in grain elevators. Our farm accident lawyers have handled cases involving tractor accidents, the failure of a three-point hitch, harvesting equipment, potato harvesters, roller belts, cotton strippers, grain augers, and even a case involving a truck backing into a worker during vegetable packing operations. Our law firm has also handled cases involving center-pivot irrigation systems causing entanglement.

Most farm employment is not covered by workers’ compensation but instead has a farm liability policy. Even when there is workers’ compensation we can often identify either a defective product or a third-party claim to make a recovery for our client. Each case is different and we can give you an analysis of the facts of your accident to determine whether you have a claim.

How Farming Injuries Happen

Farms present numerous risks that one may not encounter on a typical property or workplace. Most farms use large, heavy pieces of equipment. Such equipment poses a risk of injury to farmworkers and visitors alike. Similarly, farm animals can be unpredictable and pose another heightened risk of injury to those who work on farms.

Farm accidents can produce catastrophic injuries and sometimes they lead to wrongful death cases. Common causes of farm accident litigation include the following, for example:

  • Propane gas explosions
  • Workers kicked or trampled by horses, cows or other animals
  • Auto accidents caused by farm animals that have gotten through fencing onto the roads
  • Falls from tractors, combines, or other heavy equipment
  • Individuals crushed by heavy farm equipment
  • Common slip and fall accidents

Types of Farm Injuries

Like other workplace injuries, injuries sustained as a result of farm accidents can be very severe. Injuries may include amputations, broken bones, brain injuries, spinal cord injuries and even wrongful death. Injuries sustained on a farm may produce high medical bills and lost wages in addition to pain and suffering.

In addition to common law negligence claims and potential strict liability claims against equipment manufacturers, farm accident lawyers must the availability of farm liability insurance as traditional workers’ compensation does not cover most farm accidents.

Our Experience with Farm Injuries

The law firm of Glasheen, Valles & Inderman has extensive experience investigating, settling and litigating complicated farm accident cases. We have handled several grain engulfment cases involving affixation and death in grain elevators. We have handled cases involving tractor accidents, the failure of a three-point hitch, harvesting equipment, potato harvesters, roller belts, cotton strippers, grain augers, and even a case involving a truck backing into a worker during vegetable packing operations. Our law firm has also handled cases involving center-pivot irrigation systems causing entanglement.

Each case is different, and our farm accident lawyers can give you an analysis of the facts of your accident to determine whether you have a claim.

If you or a loved one has been injured in an accident regardless of where you live, we will be happy to evaluate your potential case through a free consultation.

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    Glasheen Valles and Inderman was the best choice by far. - Eleana Flores
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    • Board Certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization in Civil Trial Law and Personal Injury Trial Law
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    Past Success

    Past settlements including $932,000 for a cotton gin injury, amputated fingers and $455,000 in a grain elevator accident, death case. *All Amounts listed are Net to Clients. Results obtained depend on the facts of each case.

    Toggle Modal all workplace-accidents farm-injuries
    1.6 million
    Cotton Gin Injury | Amputated FingersOur client had several fingers amputated in a cotton gin due to the lack of appropriate guards on the lint…
    Toggle Modal all motorcycle-accidents brain-injuries semi-truck-injury-attorney
    9.9 million
    Motorcycle/18-Wheeler Truck Wreck | Brain InjuryOur client was driving a motorcycle when a truck ran a stop sign in front of him. Our client suffered…
    Toggle Modal all semi-truck-injury-attorney wrongful-death
    9.4 million
    18-Wheeler Wreck | Wrongful DeathOur client was driving on Interstate 10 in southwest New Mexico near Lordsburg when a dust storm kicked up due…
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    Our Team is Here to Help

    Below is a list of some of the most-frequently-asked questions by our clients and prospective clients. If you still have any questions, feel free to contact us.

    • What is a board-certified attorney?

      Attorneys become Board Certified by the Texas Board of Legal Specialization in Austin, Texas, which was created by, and operates under the authority of the Supreme Court of Texas. The Board’s Members are appointed by the President of the State Bar of Texas. The Board administers the program by which a lawyer may earn a certificate of special competence in a particular field of law.

      Kevin Glasheen is Board Certified in Personal Injury and Civil Trial Law.

    • Why should I hire an attorney?

      Potential defendants are usually covered by insurance. The insurance companies are notified immediately when an accident occurs, and they usually hire attorneys and expert witnesses to investigate the claim. It is important that witnesses be interviewed as soon as possible and evidence be preserved. Witnesses will often be more difficult to locate or will have a poor memory if they are interviewed much later after the accident has occurred. Evidence such as machinery parts or skid marks on the highway will disappear unless preserved quickly. Insurance companies have insurance adjusters who will contact you and try to be friendly. You should not trust the statements that insurance adjusters make to you. They are not working for you and will sometimes make misleading statements in an effort to trick you into resolving your case. Insurance adjusters also might record your conversations with them and use your statements against you in order to try to save money for the insurance companies.

      The main thing we try to impress upon people is that it’s never too early to talk to an attorney, and it’s always too late. By that we mean that speaking with an attorney very soon after a crash or other accident in no way will harm you. Along the same lines, the longer you try to handle a claim on your own or delay hiring competent counsel, irreparable damage can be done in the form of recorded statements given to the insurance companies and evidence not being preserved. There is no risk or fee for speaking with an attorney and arranging an initial consultation.

    • Will my case go to trial?

      Whether a case goes to trial depends on dozens of factors, including your damages, the amount of insurance available, and the circumstances of the case. However, generally speaking, approximately 98% of personal injury cases settle without going to trial.

    • What is my claim worth?

      Personal injury claims are usually resolved by either settlement or by a jury. When a case is settled, it is the client’s decision of whether or not to accept a settlement offer. The lawyer will advise the client as to the potential value of the claim. Lawyers evaluate the potential value of a claim by predicting what a jury would do based on experience with similar claims.A jury can consider all sorts of damages in a personal injury case including medical expenses in the past and in the future, loss of earnings in the past and in the future as a result of the injury, physical pain and mental anguish in the past and in the future, compensation for impairment – that is loss of use, and disfigurement damages. The jury has discretion in awarding the sums. We can give you advice on the value of your claim based on our experience with some of our claims and similar jury results.

    • What if my case goes to trial and I lose?

      If you lose at trial, or if your recovery is not as high as it should be, we can discus filing an appeal, which typically happens if the judge makes a mistake during the trial. With respect to expenses and fees, you will owe us nothing for our time, attorney’s fees or our expenses if we lose your case at trial.

    • If I don’t like what my attorneys are doing, can I fire them?

      You always have the right to fire your attorney; however, if you have signed a contract with that attorney, you may have to pay that attorney a fee. The answer to that question is very fact-specific, because one of the considerations as to whether you owe the first attorney a fee is whether you have “good cause” for firing that attorney.

      What we recommend is, if you are unhappy with your current attorney, try to communicate that to them first. Let them know why you are unhappy so that they have a chance to remedy the problem. If you cannot get in contact with your attorney, or if they are unable or unwilling to remedy the problem, then your next step would be to consult another personal injury attorney. The new attorney can advise you about your contract with the first attorney. If you have “good cause” for firing the first attorney, and you have made an unsuccessful, good-faith effort to resolve the problems with the first attorney, then your new attorney will likely be able to resolve any claims from the first attorney. Such a resolution typically involves the old attorney and the new attorney dividing the contingency fee between themselves so that you do not have to pay double fees.